Cheverly American Legion gets an ADA-accessible upgrade with free salvaged tile

Situated on a hill near the entrance to Cheverly, American Legion Post 108 has been a reminder of patriotism and civic mindedness for all those that pass by since its construction in 1941. The building itself embodies stewardship and a love of country as materials from the White House, Mclean Mansion, and the U.S. Supreme Court were all used in its construction.

Considering this history of reuse, partnering with Community Forklift for a bathroom renovation was a perfect fit! We were proud to distribute free materials to the Cheverly American Legion through the Community Building Blocks (CBB) Program. The donated surplus floor tile was used to repair and upgrade a restroom to meet ADA accessibility guidelines.

Considering this history of reuse, partnering with Community Forklift for a bathroom renovation was a perfect fit!

American Legion members are primarily veterans and their families, but the post hosts events for its members as well as for the community at large, including Boy and Girl Scout Troops. In addition, the Cheverly American Legion — along with the American Legion of Maryland — is involved in numerous charitable operations. Some of their charitable activities include providing scholarships to deserving students, assisting veterans in completing their VA benefits paperwork, and administering Maryland American Legion Youth Programs.

Community Forklift’s CBB program provides free materials to organizations for projects that benefit the community. Since 2011, we’ve worked with 400+ organizations and awarded over $400,000 in store credit for free materials. Visit our website to learn more and apply!

Going into the future, the Cheverly American Legion will surely remain a bedrock in the community, and we are thankful for the opportunity to contribute to it by providing tile for its bathroom upgrade.

***

Every time you donate or shop at Community Forklift, you’re helping us lift up local communities through reuse.  We turn the construction waste stream into a resource stream for communities in the DC region – by keeping perfectly good items out of the landfill, preserving historical materials, providing low-cost building supplies, and creating local green jobs.