Before & After: Creative reuses for salvaged stuff

Location, location, location. This salvaged chandelier from Community Forklift looks so good all lit up under a ceiling medallion! Thanks to a Forklift Fan for giving this spectacular light a spectacular new home! Photos by @elainainstagram (Instagram)


The new owner of this china cabinet from Community Forklift enlisted Tim Kime to give it a brand new look! From Tim: “Through the upcycling process, everyone won. The family has a cabinet they now love and treasure, Community Forklift got resources to support its mission, I was able to use my artistic talents, and Mother Nature was honored by keeping materials from going to the landfill.” Thank you both for supporting reuse and for giving this cabinet a new home! Photos by @cammaranomatopoeia and @TimKimeArt (Instagram)


It’s hard to believe this is the same set! Community Forklift Fan Patrick Calder rescued this vintage croquet set from the reuse warehouse and completely revamped it. The project involved rebuilding and carving a broken stake, removing rust from and painting the stand, sanding and repainting the mallets, installing new mallet caps, cutting and bending new wickets, and finding a vintage set of croquet balls to match.

From Patrick: “There were a lot of steps to this project. It probably took two months, with lots of ‘do this, and wait a day, and repeat’. But I enjoyed it, and got to try a few new things. And I always like bringing something back.”

I’d say this something was brought WAY back … it looks amazing! Thanks for giving the set a new lease on life providing fun for a whole new generation! Photos by Patrick Calder


A Forklift Fan used salvaged cabinets from our reuse warehouse to extend their kitchen into an unused corner of their home. The four uppers and lowers at the back of the kitchen are from Community Forklift, but the rest of the kitchen was there when they bought the house! They wrote:

“The styles are similar but the existing cabinets have a slightly different detail on the door and the uppers are taller, but because they are a little detached you can only tell if you really look for it! We color matched the paint and sprayed to match. We had to repair one drawer front and swapped out the hardware to match, too. We basically just kept an eye out for cabinets that were a close match to what we had, and scored big time when these happened to be sold individually instead of as a set! All up between the cabinets, paint, hardware, and countertop, we spent about $350 on the project.”

Thanks for saving these cabinets from the landfill and supporting our nonprofit! Photos by @lunabloom (Instagram)


Check out this custom frame created out of salvaged lumber from the reuse warehouse! The red looks great against that wall color and coordinates so well with the poster. The Forklift Fan who created the frame put it best: “now it’s bringing some color to the background of my zoom calls and I’ll be singing to myself.” Thanks for giving that lumber a new lease on life! Photos by @ericmarrapodi (Instagram)


RELATED POSTS

May 2022: Creative uses for salvaged materials from the reuse warehouse
April 2022: Forklift Fans put salvaged materials to good reuse!
March 2022: Salvaged materials for a fireplace and furniture
February 2022: Reuse inspiration for cabinet sets and single cabinets
February 2022: New uses for salvaged materials from Community Forklift
January 2022: Creative projects using materials from Community Forklift
December 2021: Salvaged Materials from Community Forklift get a new use
November 2021: Upcycling Projects using Community Forklift materials
October 2021: Projects created with salvage from Community Forklift
September 2021: Upcycling Projects Created with Salvaged Materials


Would you like to share a project that you’ve completed using salvaged materials from Community Forklift? Send photos and a short description to outreach@CommunityForklift.org or tag us on Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter!

***

Every time you donate or shop at Community Forklift, you’re helping us lift up local communities through reuse.  We turn the construction waste stream into a resource stream for communities in the DC region – by keeping perfectly good items out of the landfill, preserving historical materials, providing low-cost building supplies, and creating local green jobs.